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5 Steps for Strategic Business Upgrade Planning

upgrade, system, planning, business planning, business upgrades, company, work, upgrade system,

A very exciting time in your company might be when you realize that you have to upgrade your systems to keep with the times. It can be very frustrating and can take some time too depending on what needs to be updated. There’s a lot that has to go into the thought process before starting…

Two Approaches

  • The company in question always has to have the latest and greatest, who change their systems as soon as upgrades become available.
  • The company in question goes through more traditional means. Why change what they have when it’s working perfectly fine? These companies upgrade only when forced to do so.

The upgrade plan has to focus on future growth and changes forecasted by the company. The question that needs to be asked when looking ahead is, how will the changes affect upgrade needs in the future?

Five Steps to Planning Upgrades

1. Categorize and Prioritize: Categories include

i. Client Computer Systems
ii. Peripherals
iii. Client Software
iv. Server hardware and software
v. Security
vi. Network devices
vii. Network Infrastructure

Here items can be picked and chosen as to what the organization decides to upgrade. In this if needed subcategories can be created in order to create a more organized plan.

2. Set Priorities: Prioritize based on the costs and benefits ratio. What items need to be upgraded first? Is it an urgent need or a want? Make sure to not upgrade needlessly, make sure that it’s really needed.

3. Consider Dependencies: When the company is upgrading their systems they need to take into consideration what might be dependent on others. This might create more upgrades in order for the system to work with the new equipment. Or if applications are being upgraded, the system might need to be upgraded in order to work with them.

4. Phased Rollout: Don’t rush it. Testing and discovering of bugs need to be worked out before starting to use the new system. After the tests are completed use small groups of employees to test the upgrades in the production environment. If there’s a learning curve use the fast learners first as they can then learn the new system and assist/teach the others when it rolls out.

5. Keep it Scalable: Write out the plan. Get input from other departments and different levels to help create the plan. Plans for expansion of the company and any restructuring needs to be taken into account here too.

Proper Planning

If the organization follows proper planning with scalability included in the process, it can create a very smooth upgrade environment for the company. It would help immensely as upgrading systems can be very costly and stressful if not done correctly. Never rush the process and take time to consider all options before jumping in.

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3 Phases of Business Analysis Verification Testing

test, work, , business analysis, business, complete, system, strategic planning, software

The first thing you should do after buying a product for the business analysis solution is to verify if the software will work with your vision.  Will it do what it is supposed to do?  When it is being verified the testing team who can be anyone from developers, QA and business analysts work with the software to make sure that it really works for what it was bought and/or created for.  There are many phases to be completed in order to ensure the new product will work well with your system.

The Test Phases

The Smoke Test comes before anything.  It’s a pretest to find out if full testing can begin.  This test shows simple failures that could keep further tests from being executed in the next 3 phases.

  1. Unit Test: Here every unit is tested separately to find any possible bugs before moving on.  It’s another name for the smoke test.  Don’t just have the development team test it here, but others to so there will be unbiased testing completed.
  2. Integration Test: This part makes sure that all the individual parts can work together; either as a subsystem or linked units.  Here you would want to find problems with how components will work together in the software architecture design.  This includes multiple levels of integration where subsystems might be brought in to see if they would work, then attached to larger subsystems when in compliance.  The development team and possibly business analysists work here.
  3. System Test: Here is where problems are found with how the new system meets users’ needs.  It’s ran through the entire system, auditing everything from linear perspective’s.  It’s the last chance before turning over to a user acceptance test, and verifies if the software meets original requirements.  The business analyst works here for the most part.

Other Tests to Be Completed

There are numerous other tests that have to be completed during these 3 phases.

  • Requirements validation test: Verifies system logic, making sure that it supports system analysis.
  • Regression Test: Retesting to ensure changes don’t break what is working.  There’s usually more than one test completed to make sure all the applications work.
  • Dynamic Test: Testing of the software in different circumstances.  There are 3 tests completed here:
    • The Performance Test: How fast can the system complete functions?
    • The Stress Test: Push the software to its limits to see how it handles levels of users, rates of input and speed of response.
    • Volume Test: Can the new software handle growth projections?
  • Security Test
  • Installation Test
  • Configuration Test
  • Usability Test

Why Test and a Way To Help Implement

With all these tests completed it will help you to not have problems down the road.  There’s a need to make sure that everything will work before turning it loose for everyone to use in your company or sell online to your customers.  Click here to get an awesome partition assistant from AOMEI to help maximize disk space and improve the performance of your computer(s).  This will be needed when growing your system, implementing new programs and applications.  The best part of this is that it has the Windows to Go Creator which would help immensely in the long run too.

 

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The Internet Revolution for Business

business, internet, customer, work, product

The Internet has grown so much since its inception decades ago.  To the point that it influences our daily life, school and the work environment.  1/3rd of humanity uses the Internet presently.  Due to this the business environment has changed immensely due to how many people log on every day in order to communicate with each other.  The Internet has been implemented by business for marketing and promotion of products and services as people are leaning towards doing all their shopping online, or as much of it as possible.

Porter’s Five Force Model

This offers frameworks to measure industry competition and analysis, and helps to build business strategies.  What are threats from present and future competition and existing substitutes?  How much bargaining power do customers have and measures negotiating power of suppliers?

Threat New Entrants:  There is a lower entry barrier in being able to set up new businesses due to the Internet.  Increasing competition lowered margins too.

Threat New Substitutes:  There has been a reduction of the product life cycle due to the Internet.  Encouraging innovation and new shelf lives of products are now the norm for customer serving.

Bargaining Power Customers:  The customer is now well informed in what products do and what may be good substitutes.  In this businesses have to watch what they put out there dealing with differentiation and pricing.

Bargaining Power Suppliers:  Suppliers are in the same boat as the customer is now too except focusing on the industry they are in.

Threat of Competition It is now extremely important to be transparent and honest in order to become successful.  The customer knows more about the business, and the Internet lowered cost of searching for new products.

Internet and Business

How the Internet changed business can be measured in many ways.  The main thing is that it opened new avenues to be able to conduct business more smoothly, timely, and cost efficiently depending on the situation.

Communication:  There are now a lot of new ways to connect to others and disperse information.  Email, Instant Messaging, Intranet, Skype…

Collaboration:  There is no such thing as geographical boundaries as the Internet allows for ease of collaboration now.  The only thing that has to be considered is time zones as not everyone might be working in the same time zone.  Meetings would have to be scheduled around that…

Business Transactions:  There is now a culture of online businesses.  Many stores have been opened up online.  Now Internet banking and payment gateways are a normal part of supply chain transactions.

Work Flexibility Now it is possible to work from home or in remote locations.  Employees can now remain in touch with the company while away in order to know what’s going on at work.  They can also complete work from these locations through logging into the secure business Intranet.

Web Based Applications Here is where cloud computing comes to play.  It saves so much space and money depending on what the company buys into.

Conclusion

The Internet is both a good and a bad thing for business.  It’s good as the company can spread their products or services all over, or locally depending.  They can learn more about their competition, learn more about what their customers want, what their suppliers might suggest.  It makes communication a lot easier than ever.  On the bad side though it allows for hackers to find ways to attack them and steal information.  Security has to be high priority in order to make sure that this doesn’t happen.  Employees and customers don’t need to worry about identity theft to name one vulnerability.  The pluses outweigh the negatives though…