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CRM vs ERP: What’s the difference and which do you need? (via CIO)

ERP, CRM, data, data science, data management, data scientist

Both CRM and ERP systems handle contacts, companies, quotes, orders and forecasts… and they may handle line-item configuration, bundles, delivery schedules and invoices. Where does one start and the other stop? Behold this guide for the bewildered.

Source: CIO

Review of Article

What are the differences between CRM and ERP?  Both have similarities and differences at the same time.  CRM’s purpose is sales and support type companies.  In other words, they work directly with the customer, but don’t directly deal with fulfilling orders.  ERP users on the other hand focus on the process and logistics of producing items to sell.  They don’t usually call customers unless it’s to reply to complaints.

In larger companies they use both types of IT systems.  ERP handles the distribution centers, supply chains, currencies and manufacturing plants.  CRM benefits support purposes, sales and marketing, both domestic and international.  Smaller companies don’t need the entire package, they only will use fragments of either CRM or ERP,  such as accounting packages and contact management systems.

What is ERP?

ERP deals with financial data, production and optimization.  This type of system manages transactions, accounts payable and receivable, taxes, cash flow management, and quarterly statements.  It also handles production schedules, procurement, inventory, fulfillment centers and supply chain management.  ERP lastly coordinates production across many manufacturing plants, wants to find ways to maximize profitability, and improve performances of supply chains to name a few things that it does.

What is CRM?

CRM deals with sales force automation.  CRM has to support these business processes:

  • Lead Qualification
  • Forecasting and Pipeline Management
  • Creating Quotes and Construct Orders
  • Account Management
  • Renewals / Repeat Orders

Summary

Personally if my company were big enough I would consider buying and using bits and pieces of both, not integrating the two systems together, but doing something like before mentioned.  It makes sense to me to just get the parts I need to run my business, as much as I can.  The question becomes, which one is what your company needs?  Do you focus more on the customer directly or strategies and logistics behind the scenes?  Or do you think you’ll need bits and pieces of both?

 

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What is ERP? A guide to enterprise resource planning systems (via CIO)

ERP, upgrade system, business, strategy

A very interesting and in-depth article about ERP and why you should consider using it.  A very good read that gives a lot of good information.

The Article

ERP combines software systems from departments like finance, human resources and warehouse management.  It combines it into a single, integrated software program running off a single database.  This way the various departments can more easily share information and collaborate. It’s a tall order, but that integrated approach can have a tremendous payback if companies install the software correctly.

Source: CIO

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What is Unit Oriented Architecture?

system architecture, computer architecture, system, UOA, unit oriented architecture, systems,

Definition of UOA

UOA is an business method of performing tasks based on the hierarchical composition of different units of software. These units give support to both operational and actions completed in technological systems. UOA creates groups of software fully supporting purpose, function, behavior, and structure of these systems. It helps clarify and strengthen architectures through finding right places and owners for assets. Included are web applications, mobile apps, web services and business processes to name a few. The unit then becomes both a construct and micro-platform that allows other components plugin.

Key Points of UOA

  • Creates digital constructs for actions completed and operational support
  • Views companies as a Composite (control) or Leaf (functional)
  • Unit software has to be comfortable and work in the unit assigned
  • Every unit has to have formal software boundaries. They represent contracts between assemblies both in and out of the agency.
  • All units have to run operations implemented as business processes that are executable. Every process is owned by one section only.
  • There is particular emphasis on control units. It causes a weakness in the company as only a few personnel will know how to run it.

What Does UOA Do?

UOA uses Systems Thinking to define problems. It uses Organization Design to configure enterprise and composite units. SOA uses constructing unit boundaries, and Business Rules to govern the system to name a few.

UOA allows practical and natural approaches to satisfy the needs of users. It completes this through unit orientation and clarity of what the system is supposed to do. Hierarchical unit structure helps define roles and spreads responsibilities between all the units. It creates a stable system where it can adapt, develop and grow fast. Process-centric (inside) and event-driven integration (outside) is where processes pass through the units to complete work.

Differentiation between functional and control units is defined here. Functional (leaf) units don’t contain other groups. They provide services and products, all digital. Control units have more entities in them. Actions are directed, coordinated, measured and controlled to ensure best means to get the bottom line. There’s a clear understanding of what everyone is to do in the company and delegates decision making to the right people.

Supported are operations interactions. The direction of vision focuses towards products and services instead of the process is itself. The quality of communication between system parts is considered more important than the quality of parts. The character of interfaces measures effectiveness.

The Possibilities

If a company’s units support strongly built digital constructs that entirely concentrate on the customer, everything will grow. Effectiveness, efficiency, and efficacy will improve. New capabilities initiate with further development. Growth through cloned abilities will occur, while agility will increase speed. There are numerous opportunities abound.

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10 ERP Upgrade Mistakes to Avoid

ERP, strategic planning, business, upgrade, IT, information technology, information systems, competitive advantage

What Is ERP?

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) has to be considered part of the plan when upgrading your system. In this information technology (IT) has to be combined with the business process to help bring a competitive advantage to others in the same industry. It is anything from reading an e-mail to updating records of procedures. An ERP is an application that uses a centralized database to run the entire company. This medium allows data from one department for viewing in other branches of the same company. It can be bought either as modules for different parts of the agency, or a subset. ERP systems are there to enforce processes that your business will adopt.

Upgrade Mistakes

  1. Not explaining what new systems means to users before starting the project – If the users of the upgrades don’t know why it’s happening and are in agreement, the update will fail.
  2. Not load testing systems with scripts and end users – How do you know if your file loads are typical? Load testing with scripts and users will complete real tests in this area to make sure that the process will work or not.
  3. Not performing tests of the new process to see if it works or not – Will everything work as planned?
  4. Not taking change management or testing sincerely – Know everything you need to know about the change and regression tests beforehand, so you aren’t surprised by “new opportunities.”
  5. Assigning internal personnel as project managers – Get a consultant project manager as they will focus on the upgrade only. They’ll catch the mistakes made and keep things on schedule and budget.
  6. Not telling others of changes before they happen – End users don’t like change so make sure to communicate before so they aren’t caught off guard.
  7. Giving classroom training only – Allow for video training that the users can find and use if they come across a problem they can’t fix. Create a Knowledge area that they can access to see before elevating.
  8. Not moving components to open business standards – This speeds up future upgrades that will happen. Try to change reports and interfaces to open business standards. It will help a lot in the future, and possibly save money with more completed upgrades.
  9. Not archiving before upgrading and keeping up security during – Archiving before upgrading will save you time and money. It speeds up queries on large tables, and table conversions as they are will run quicker. Security wise, upgrades are to be need-to-know only. There’s no use in upgrading if spies find a way to get the information out to your competitors.
  10. Assuming internal tech personnel will pick up years of experience in weeks – Keep the consultants around for a while after the upgrade is complete. Enhancements aren’t easy to learn, and someone has to be there who knows how to run the system. Or at least until the first workers understand the system as well.

Impact of IT on Business

IT has a significant impact on how companies design, build and support their business processes. Information systems have a considerable effect on how these methods work. Agencies improve effectiveness and quality of products and services through empowering their employees. Something to consider.