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4 Best Practices for Big Data Privacy

big data, data, data privacy, privacy, security, data security, cloud, cloud storage

Source: TechTarget

Introduction 

Big data is becoming a more popular method of gathering data for business purposes.  It seems like it isn’t just for storing data anymore.  As a result, more companies are using the data to gather useful information via business events.  This can be anything from reviewing contracts to finding new ways to entice potential customers to your store.  Because of this it doesn’t have the old way of doing things like passing information from the company server to data storage.  Consequently, it uses virtualization architecture to draw from large content stores and archives; as a result of finding this information, it becomes a global resource.  In turn this allows for better forecasting and predictions that might actually work. 

Sources of Privacy Concerns 

  • Quality and Accuracy of Data – How will it possibly negatively affect people in decisions being made?  How does the Internet affect data through possible bad Internet searches?  Is it possible that the scientist looking up the information might be using unverified information without realizing it? 

Best Practices in Big Data Privacy 

  1. Developing High Competency – You need to become extremely proficient in finding, buying and managing cloud services which are considered an intragyral part of big data for keeping costs down.    There are also companies that prefer not to make the investment and in its place use cloud-based applications, infrastructure, and processing power.  Anyways around it, to ensure privacy there has to be constant monitoring and audits of cloud services that your company is using.  Checking on data integrity, confidentiality and availability are all a must. 
  2. Implementing Converged Storage – It’s much more efficient and reduces possible errors.  Because of this, it increases data quality and accuracy.  There’s going to be a reducing of duplicate data being stored in the same locations and increase cost efficiency too. 
  3. Properly Sanitizing Data –  Make sure to analyze, filter, join, diagnose data at the earliest possible touch points.  It’ll make work much easier without having to go back fixing errors while saving you money in the long run. 
  4. Encourage and Invite – Make some sort of process for consumers to be able to gain access to, review and correct information already collected on them, being at no cost and user-friendly.  Ensure finding privacy policies are easy to reach.  Most of all, make sure to have an easy way for people to contact you with questions or concerns that they have.   Transparency and ease of access to be able to talk to you is key. 

Summary 

Asking for the consent of gathering information is not enough now.   In conclusion, there’s so much gathering of data from others that it isn’t really a question to ask.  More on point is something like telling customers how they can restrict the use of their information or delete it.  Consequently, it’s not something that all companies would offer to their customers, therefore you should try it.  This is something that most likely is going to become a requirement for companies to tell customers in the future.  It seems that enabling privacy using best practices is going to be your best bet.  Most noteworthy it will help to increase the levels of trust and transparency that you and your customers will have in the long run, while saving money at the same time. 

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